Celebrating traditions

25 December 2012

We celebrate Christmas both the Swedish and American ways. This makes for a lot of celebrating!

For us, it all begins the day after Thanksgiving, which we usually celebrate on the Saturday afterwards, because, of course, Thanksgiving is not a work holiday here. If they are selling trees we’ll get our Christmas tree, but usually they aren’t yet, so we put up some minor decorations. As time passes we put up a lights display outside on the hedge and upstairs balcony and front gable, plus some lighted up polar bears in the yard. It’s not very many lights by my American standards, at least what’s visible from the road, but there’s only one other house in the entire village that has outdoors lights at all, so it ends up making a statement (imagine if I could get a Santa and a sleigh for the roof!) The common Swedish decorations are stars and advent lights, which look kind of like menorahs, which shine in most windows. We have those, too, and a bunch of other Christmasy crap in nearly every room (Little Girl even has her own small tree.)

Santa Lucia, on December 13th, is the first Christmas event. Swedish children dress up as a martyred Sicialian saint or a limited assorted of other characters (e.g. Star Boys, who look like KKK members, Santa, or Gingerbreadmen/women) and wear/hold battery-operated candles while singing in a procession a limited assortment of Santa Lucia songs. This year Little Girl was in two such events and we ended up unwittingly attending a third.

Meanwhile, during the month of December, our elves, one of which is an official Elf on a Shelf, are spying on the children during the day and moving around by night to different perches in the house. And every day Little Girl opens a window on the advent calendar (this year’s was by Playmobil) and we watch Sweden’s public television advent show, which is a mini-series, different every year, for children. We actually stopped midway this year because it was too frightening for Little Girl, featuring ghosts and talking skeletons and dead pet mice and bullying and aliens. Christmas has been sort of involved in the plot (e.g. you can use Sweden’s traditional Christmas soda, Julmust, to melt bones, on the pretext that soda unhealthy for your body) but there’s a lot else going on, too. (Husband says one year it was all about the different constellations and it is not weird it is not very Christmasy.)

We also like to fit in one public dancing around the Christmas tree singing the same folk songs you sing (e.g. about small strange frogs or doing the laundry) when you dance around the Maypole in the summer. We did this at another traditional Swedish Christmas event, an outside old-fashioned Christmas market, where you can by handicrafts and glögg (mulled wine) and locally-produced flour and see an old-fashioned Santa (known here as Tomten) who disconcertingly is wearing grey and not red. (This was the first year Little Girl could not be cajoled to sit on Santa’s lap.)

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We do a full celebration of Swedish Christmas on Christmas Eve with all the cousins at the grandparents’ place. This involves food and a visit from Tomten, which the children’s grandfather sadly misses each year as he happens at that moment to be out “buying a newspaper.” At home that night we put out milk and cookies for Santa, and the next morning we go downstairs to see he has eaten his snack, filled the stockings, added a present each for the children, and left footprints by the fireplace. It is a lot of Christmas, frankly, but the two Christmases seems unavoidable now that Little Girl is used to both. And it’s also fun!

I have a weakness for Christmas music and insist on its being played throughout the house non-stop at all times for the entire month of December. It’s a real bummer that they don’t play Christmas music on the radio here (occasionally they’ll sprinkle something in with the usual boring stuff). This year we had some perfect timing: Little Girl lost the second of her two front teeth and could sing the classic kids’ song “All I Want for Christmas is My Two Front Teeth.”

While I do enjoy some religious Christmas music, otherwise my celebration of the holiday is entirely secular. At school Little Girl has learned about, and done crafts featuring, Jesus. (Also, the entire school walked down to the village church twice in the month of December for religious events, which drives my American separation-of-church-and-state-self nuts). Following Little Girl’s informing me of the goodness and importance of Jesus I felt I had to let her know that some people (like Mommy) think that the story of Jesus is a nice idea, but not necessarily true.

However, I take the opposite tack what with the magical elves and Santa and so forth, actively encouraging her belief in something that, unlike Jesus, has absolutely no factual basis, and I wonder why I do this. If I want her to value facts and good sense and to avoid magical thinking, then why do I not take a hard line on Santa, too? If I think it’s harmless and comforting fun to believe in Santa for a while as a child, as I do, then it seems I should treat Jesus and Christianity the same…right? This conundrum is related to my wondering whether religious Christians get irritated by the enthusiastic celebration of Christmas by non-believers, who happily leave the entire “reason for the season” out of the equation.

Of course we do have a reason for the season. Tradition for its own sake, family togetherness, an excuse to spoil each other and brighten up the winter, the passing along of cultural knowledge, the sheer fun of it. I don’t think those reasons are too bad.

6 Responses to “Celebrating traditions”

  1. Carrie Says:

    Sounds like a very fun season, if exhausting! We also have a co-mingling of traditions, but it is mostly American with a Swedish Christmas Eve.

    I am also an atheist who celebrates Santa. I guess the main difference to me is that everyone knows Santa is just a state of mind–a pretend thing to make magic for kids. Christians continue believing in a pretend man in the sky for their whole lives. Plus, they live their life according to what their own interpretation of the Bible is (could be good in general, could be very bad). While Santa is something kids outgrow and don’t dedicate a huge chunk of their life toward celebrating and living for. If that makes sense?

  2. a Says:

    That is a lot of celebrating! Songs about small, strange frogs, huh? Interesting…

  3. hanna Says:

    Sounds wonderful! I must add that the constellations are if not christmasy at least very much this time of the year for me. This is the darkest time of the year, and this is when we see stars a lot. It’s kind of hard in the summer when it’s sunlight most of the time! :) And I remember liking that julkalender!

    And several radio channels, some ordinary ones and plenty of internet ones, dedicate december to playing only christmas songs around the clock, so you just haven’t found the right channel yet! :)

    Glad fortsättning!

  4. Annika Says:

    Hi — sounds like a great celebration! Just wanted to mention that you can go to Sveriges Radio online (www.sr.se) and there are two Christmas channels there that have played nonstop Christmas music since early December to play on the computer if you have a decent internet connection. P2 Klassisk Jul och P4 Bjällerklang :)

  5. Kristina Says:

    Wow, that IS lots of celebrating! :-) It’s fun to hear all the traditions and the differences (star boys looking like KKK – kind of freaky! Guess they don’t make that association…). I love the elf changing places and watching over. I like your consideration around the myths and history of Christmas…guess we all just feel our way through and find what seems a right balance. I’m with you about the warmth, family, traditions, generosity of spirit, etc. Happy Holidays to You All from California!!!

  6. Sara Says:

    Sounds fun!

    I was wondering the same thing about my own insistence on fostering false belief in Santa. It’s just fun, I guess.


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